Ready…Set…Plan! 

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Hiiiiii beautifuls!! 🤗🤗🤗  Okay, so, no long talk. Let’s just pretend this is a blog for annual posts shall we? **huuuuge grin 😬😁…and now, straight to our first (fingers crossed not the last) “annual blog post”, it’s Ready…Set…Plan!! Whoop whoop.  … Continue reading

Around the World in Three Weddings

Today is Efua’s Twirly Tuesday everyone!!  She’s a young, smart, vibrant student at the University of Ghana who went on exchange for a year abroad and took the opportunity to explore our little world and she came up with this for Purple Twirl’s Twirly Tuesday post! Exciting!  Plus! She’s and excellent writer and poet.  Follow her blog From a Beautiful Mind…..and she writes…

“What is it about marriage that gives a bride a heart-warming radiance; makes a groom beam with pride; coaxes the sun sparkle brighter than usual and presents every one of the guests a warm glow? Perhaps it is the fact that two people on entirely different paths found each other along the way and somehow managed to find common grounds enough to decide to spend the rest of their lives together, or maybe it’s just that the sun shone brighter during the weddings I’ve been to.

Every marriage bears a significant mark that sets it apart from others, a specific emblem that makes each one entirely different and places it on a pedestal completely different from one another.

One warm exceptionally beautiful day in Scotland, two people decided to get married; it was a simple wedding with family members and a few close-knit friends, and in its simplicity, one could have mistaken it to be a normal wedding, but just when the wedding vows were being exchanged and everyone was thinking: “what a simple nice wedding,” they heard the hoots of an owl and as everyone turned towards the sound, two great owls swooped down bearing the wedding rings and as these trained owls took their places and handed over the rings, this unique event caused an excited stir in all the guests.

In France, two lovely young people chose a cool spring morning to exchange their vows, and as everyone gazed at the couple with warm and gentle smiles, they remarked on the extraordinary details; particularly noting how the parents of the couple were adorned with the same colours and designs. Nothing about this seemed extraordinary until it was found out that the dressing was never planned, and they were at liberty to wear whatever colours or designs they wanted. And oh yes! It was it was a military wedding, and nothing quite beats a row of handsome young men dressed in military uniforms at a wedding.

Everything seemed quite ordinary at this Ghanaian wedding, after the blessing and the vows, the guests headed off to the reception but as I said, there is always that one thing. This time it wasn’t until after the church blessing that we realized that the reception was at the beach side, and when the bride decided to go barefooted on the cool grainy sand and the children run around without shoes on the sandy shores, photography time became a real treat. Let’s face it, when the bride decides to let go, everyone wants to go barefooted too. After all those wedding heels are murderous!

I have realized that even the colours of a wedding makes can make an impression, whether it’s fuchsia and orange or pink and white, or whether one decides to go with silver and green, each combination of colour creates an ambiance that is matchless. What makes Ghanaian weddings unique are colours and ambiance. As the Europeans go for a more laid back use of colour, Ghanaians pride themselves with exceptional combinations of colours to create a kaleidoscope of beauty and excitement. And of course there is the ambiance, each wedding, well almost, produces a joyful ambiance that radiates and causes smiles all around. However, with the excited chatter, questionable dance moves, cultural tones and the unmatched Ghanaian amazing sense of humour, and this is not biased, I have to say Ghanaian weddings make a mark that stay in your heart forever and leave you wanting for more.

But as Gene Perret put it: “We have the greatest pre-nuptial agreement in the world.  It’s called love.”  And so whether it is an owl swooping down with the wedding rings, or an uncanny coincidence at a military wedding, or an elaborate exciting wedding; whether in Africa, in Europe, in Australia, or even on the moon; it all comes down to the fact that two people who love each other have decided to commit their marriage to God and live together always. And in the end it’s never really about the wedding, but it is about how the marriage will survive and manage to find light even in the deepest obscurity. A wise man, that Perret, but of all the weddings I have been to, it is the occasion that makes lasting memories for everyone present. The thing is that, quietly lurking in the background as though not present but invisibly holding the threads of the wedding together is a wedding planner. Who is usually going through silent torture only to make sure that everything goes as planned and the couple has the perfect wedding they have always wanted.”

Lovely piece isn’t it?! Send your blog post in.  It could be about aaaaaanything, as long as you want to share with us.  We’re waiting to read from you 🙂  Send in your blogs to info@thepurpletwirl.com and thank you for reading once again.  xo

Twirly Tuesday: I Do! – Then & Now

Good morning lovely people! I hope everyone enjoyed their Republic Day holiday. Twirly Tuesday is here again! So Nanadwoa finally wrote a post!!! Whoop whoop. (for all the newbies to our blog, is my PA). It’s about the myths and facts about some wedding practices! Find out why they were practiced in the past and how modernization has oh so changed the original reasons. I love the part about the veil and the couple not seeing each other before the wedding. lol. Read on…

“Curiosity they say killed the cat!

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I’ve always wondered why certain acts are considered abominable towards the big day.
Some wedding traditions and superstitions are so engrained in our culture that we don’t even think to question them. But do you know why a bride tosses the bouquet over her head? For what possible reason would a couple save a layer of cake in their freezer for a year? And why do brides go to such lengths to keep their grooms from seeing their dresses before it’s time to walk down the aisle? Let’s explore the origins of five wedding superstitions and help you find ways to incorporate tradition into your special day along with a few fun, modern twists. We shall explore three of these superstitions today and continue with the rest next week.

1. It’s bad luck for the groom to see the bride in her wedding dress before the ceremony.

Origin: During the time when arranged marriages were custom, the betrothed couple wasn’t allowed to see each other before the wedding at all. The wedding symbolized a business deal between two families (romantic, huh?), and a father would have been pleased for his daughter to marry a man from a rich, land-owning family. But he also feared that if the groom met the bride before the wedding and thought she wasn’t attractive, he’d call off the wedding, casting shame onto the bride and her family. Therefore, it became tradition that the bride and groom were only allowed to meet at the wedding ceremony so that the groom did not have the opportunity to change his mind. And that veil the bride wears? Its original purpose was also to keep the groom from finding out what the bride looked like until the last possible minute, when it was too late to back out of the transaction.

Today: Although arranged marriages are no longer common, most brides still don’t want their groom to see them all done up before the wedding. Many believe it makes the day more exciting and memorable. However, some couples feel they’ll be more relaxed if they see each other for just a few minutes before the ceremony. The added bonus is that you can take your formal pictures pre-ceremony when everyone is freshly done-up. It’s completely up to you and your groom. Talk about it before the big day arrives and find out what makes the most sense for you.

2.The bride must wear something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue (and a silver sixpence in her shoe).

Origin: This Victorian rhyme is a time-honored tradition that is supposed to bring the bride good luck. Wearing “something old” expresses the newlywed couple’s desire to retain connections with their family once they enter into married life. One tradition suggests that the bride’s “something old” be an old garter given to the bride by a happily married woman so that the new bride would also enjoy a happy marriage. Wearing “something new” conveys that the couple is creating a new union that will endure forever and looking to the future for health, happiness and success. “Something borrowed” is an opportunity for the bride’s friends or family to lend her something special as a token of their love. And finally, “something blue” is a symbol of fidelity and constancy. This custom began in ancient Israel, where brides wore a blue ribbon in their hair to symbolize this promise to their new husbands. What you may not realize is that the rhyme actually ends with “…and a silver sixpence in her shoe.” Story says that placing a penny in the bride’s shoe will bring her a life filled with good fortune.

Today: Many modern brides find it fun to keep with tradition by wearing something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue. Think of creative ways to incorporate all four items into your wedding-day ensemble.

3.The person who catches the bride’s bouquet or garter when she tosses it over her head will be the next to get married.

Origin: The story behind this tradition is downright dirty. In medieval times, it was considered lucky to get a fragment of the bride’s clothing, so hordes of guests would follow the newlywed couple into their wedding chamber after the ceremony and stand around the bed, trying to rip pieces of the bride’s gown right off her body. Because dresses were often torn apart, brides searched for alternatives to preserve their gowns and began throwing their bouquets to distract guests while they made their getaway. When the bride and groom made it safely into their wedding chamber, the groom would then crack open the door and toss the bride’s garter to the throngs of people waiting outside as a way of saying that he was about to “seal the deal.”

Today: At many modern weddings, the groom removes and tosses the bride’s garter to the groomsmen right after the bride tosses her bouquet to the bridesmaids. Traditionally, the unmarried man who catches the garter must place it on the leg of the unmarried woman who catches the bouquet, and it is said that they will be the next two to marry (not necessarily to each other). It’s a fun ritual, but many couples have chosen not to include it because guests could be injured easily, and it might embarrass the single women who are “dragged” to the floor to participate. If you have doubts about including this tradition in your wedding, consider an anniversary dance instead, which honors the longest-married couple by presenting them with the bouquet. How it works: Ask your married couples to join you on the dance floor as a slow song plays. Throughout the song, your DJ or bandleader will ask guests to sit down as their length of marriage is called out.”

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Learned something new?? I did! Thanks so much for reading!! We’re still accepting post and articles from all over for Twirly Tuedsays so pleeeeease keep sending them to info@thepurpletwirl.com. Have a fruitful week everyone. xo